Jenny Andersson is a Research Professor at SciencesPo, Centre for European Studies and Comparative Politics (CNRS) in Paris.

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She joined the CNRS and Sciences po in 2009 after several visiting and post-doctoral fellowships at the European University Institute, Florence, and at the Center for European Studies, Harvard University. Jenny is currently Visiting professor at the Department of the History of Ideas and Science at Uppsala University and leader of the programme Neoliberalism in the Nordics (funded by Riksbankens Jubileumsfond).

Jenny was the Principal Investigator of the ERC project Futurepol: A political history of the future. Knowledge production and future governance in the post war period. Focused on the history of future research, prediction, futurology and futures studies in the global field, the five-person team conducted original archival research permitting important studies of the circulation and constitution of future expertise in the post war period, and the role of prediction as a source of governmentality. The project has produced several important publications, such as The great future debate and the struggle for the world (American Historical Review, 117, 5, 2012) and Andersson and Rindzeviciute, 2015, The struggle for the long term in transnational science and politics : Forging the future (Routledge, New perspectives in history). Also out of the project, Jenny’s book The future of the world. Futurology, futurists and the making of the post Cold War world came out on OUP in 2018.

Among a wide range of appointments Jenny is a member of several international research projects with relevance for the NEEDS conference, What does the future hold, funded by the Swedish National Research Council together with Erik Westholm, and Global foresight : Anticipatory governance and the making of geocultural scenarios (lead by Christina Garsten, SCORE, Stockholm University). Andersson is co-author, with Sandra Kemp, of the forthcoming volume Futures. Interdisciplinary perspectives on futurity, Oxford University Press.